My Photo
Blog powered by Typepad

Personal favorites

Search my library


Library Thing


Victorian Studies

Authors

Fiction

Fine Arts

Buy Books!

Sitemeter

Amazon

« Ups and Downs | Main | Literary Life »

April 30, 2004

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451aed169e200d8345c9f2269e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Reinflation:

Comments

Michael Tinkler

Come to think of it, why does grade inflation "allo[w]" faculty to single out the best students for additional attention? Please tell me it isn't because the teacher has reduced the amount of time s/he spends grading. Please?
Sorry to break it to you, but that's the only way I managed to understand it. I suppose grading would be a lot faster if one compressed the scale and only troubled oneself about dividing A from A- students?

Miriam

Well, that should make grading this last set of term papers really easy! *rolls eyes*

(My students wish, eh?)

Jonathan Dresner

I have toyed with reducing the number of levels of grades, and found it usually quite liberating, particularly for shorter, simpler projects.

But it's not inflation: what I do is eliminate plus/minus grades (or sometimes just minus grades, if I'm using a 4-point scale).

I was inspired to do this by two things. First was the amount of time I spent debating grades with myself, compared to the amount of time students spend considering their grades. Second was a discussion of student course evaluations, in which a psychology prof revealed that people can't really understand a scale of more than about seven steps: beyond that and the difference between steps becomes increasingly arbitrary.

Part of the grade inflation debate is over meaning: too finely divided a scale doesn't work.

Suffering

I am currently taking the class Professor Coplin's mentions in the article. Shoddy reasoning abounds.

Anyway, I recently discussed one of my papers with the Professor. He demanded that my paper use statistics (how delightfully ironic considering his article!). I pointed out that no statistics were available.

"Just bullshit some," he said. "Everyone does it. Just make sure it's good bullshit."

Tells you something, doesn't it?

The comments to this entry are closed.