My Photo
Blog powered by Typepad

Currently reading...

Personal favorites

Search my library


Library Thing


Victorian Studies

Authors

Fiction

Fine Arts

Buy Books!

Blogs, Book- and Academia-Related

Sitemeter

Amazon

« Eeek! | Main | Self-contradiction »

August 23, 2005

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451aed169e200d8349c517569e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Ice breaker:

Comments

Scott Eric Kaufman

That sounds like a fantastic course, Miriam. Had I taken one similar in addition to Michael Clark's trial-by-fire of an Intro. to Literary Theory--which doubled as an exercise in contemporary bibliographic methods, by which I mean "finding contemporary criticism about works of literature and theory"--I wouldn't have to had invented the wheel when I started researching turn-of-the-century literature.

Miriam Elizabeth Burstein

Is that a graduate version of the dreaded CR100A? (I eventually got an "A" in that course, but the first midterm produced some pretty scary results, let me tell you...)

Bill Tozier

May I suggest an individual copy of a periodical as well? The differences in endmatter (and often illustrations) between the bound and unbound versions can amount to a quarter of the pages of the magazine, in some cases.

In the books we're scanning for Project Gutenberg we've been wrestling lately with both unannounced variant editions (probably books sold by subscription in different bindings... but why have the text blocks been re-typeset?!), and as you say the "extra" works bound in at the end. The publishers F. M. Lupton and George Munro's Sons are both frequent contributors of these lost works, and apparently bound them in to bulk up the page counts of subscription novels, but failing to tell us who the author of the filler work is!

Scott Eric Kaufman

Miriam, I've talked about it somewhere, and would link to it if I could remember where, but it's only like CR100 in the sense that it's a survey of criticism. The trial is "the casebook," in which you choose a work of literature, take the ten critical modes you've learned, find an example of each and analyze the effect of applying that methodology to the interpretation of the text. While that sounds like a fun series for a blog (I'm such a geek now) at the time it was downright painful...especially considering that it wasn't due until after the Christmas break.

The comments to this entry are closed.