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October 25, 2009

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Emmet

Perhaps Dacre should have accepted that the Historian was as good a follow-up as we were due and leave it at that.

Hell the 'everything-but-the-kitchen-sink' Anno Dracula series would appear to be more entertaining than what you describe.

Tree of Knowledge

I'm so glad you read this so I don't have to. It sounds just horrible.

Do they or Miller even acknowledge _Carmilla_ anywhere?

snarkout.vox.com

Oh, come on, "Anno Dracula" is a delight, like Alan Moore's early, fun "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen". (And it features Jack the Ripper, to boot, as well as resurrecting Kate Reed from Stoker's first draft.)

LP, is it rocking the Carmilla schtick ("What if a boyish lover had found his way into the house, and sought to prosecute his suit in masquerade?"), or is it drawing directly from the Hammer tradition of Vampire Lovers etc.?

Emmet

Anno Dracula is nicely diverting, but a world away from Moore's League. There every reference is couched in nuance and refreshes the development of the story.

Kidman made me happy with his pastiche of Bond and references to Toby Dammit in the Italian-set sequel - BUT the continual shout-outs and in-jokes I felt choked the story.

Whereas Alan Moore draws a line of descent from Shakespeare's The Tempest to the Coen Brother's The Big Lebowski in volume two and somehow...it works!

Scott Pearson

I agree that Dracula the Undead was a deeply flawed novel with too many elements forced into the story. One can't help but wonder how far this manuscript would have gotten without Dacre Stoker's name attached to it. I find it bizarre that the authors made such a big deal about it being their goal "to right the wrongs to Bram's original classic" before they then turned the original inside out and upside down. Strangely, after all that, I must admit to being entertained while reading it. Like a summer Hollywood blockbuster, you're thrilled while the lights are down, but when the credits roll, so do your eyes.

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