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« Syllabus-ing | Main | This Week's Acquisitions »

March 23, 2011

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Brandon

It does make sense to me to treat Casaubon and Mr. Brooke as flip sides; in a sense, Mr. Brooke's "dread of the Hereafter" is a sort of latitudinarian Key to all Mythologies (Mr. Brooke claims to know "something of all schools" of theology), but only in the form of Mr. Brooke's "scrappy slovenliness" rather than Casaubon's overmeticulous antiquarianism. A sort of Broad Church / High Church duality, avant la lettre.

It's interesting that Casaubon is repeatedly associated with Catholic images: Dorothea associates him with Bossuet and Augustine early on, Naumann associates him with Aquinas.

Flavia

I don't know enough about the historical Isaac Causabon to say anything particularly informed -- and neither do I know the existing literary scholarship on the connection between the two -- but I wonder whether that (his being a Huguenot? a friend of C of E divines and associated with a monarchy suspected of being crypto-Catholic? an enemy of the Jesuits?) might be somehow relevant.

RLapides

I've noticed what Brandon has noticed, and it made me think, years ago, that Eliot was being anti-Catholic. Now I'd be more cautious about drawing this conclusion, so I'd like to know if you think this is possible, Miriam.

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