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« I am, in fact, reading books... | Main | Uh-oh »

September 03, 2012

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Comments

Flavia

I vote for the first one: it's the most simple and striking, referencing Foxe with a nice Victorian twist.

In books from my own period, the Foxe (& other similar burning-martyr) images are a little overplayed--but since this ISN'T Foxe, and ISN'T a work of Early Modern scholarship, I think that connection is a positive one; it really underscores your title and conveys the book's subject pretty immediately.

My second choice would be the queen reading the Bible; it's the most visually interesting of the other three, though it doesn't illuminate your title as immediately.

Mr Punch

I agree with Flavia. The color one might work with a different title and subtitle (e.g., Conversion and Controversy: The Reformation in Victorian Historical Fiction) (not an actual suggestion) but not this title.

Miriam

So far, two votes for burning at the stake...

tatiana.larina

I vote for the burning at stake too. The Lady is for Burning!

Sarah

The burning at the stake picture is the most visually striking, while also obviously on topic. I vote for it too.

nbm

I'm glad the Brown is out of range. They are all awful pictures, but the Brown's ambition and pretention makes it awful to a new degree. As for the immolation, it's not that I object, but you'd best be very sure that's what you want on your cover.

Miriam

Unfortunately, this subject is not one that tended to inspire brilliant art...

Nemo

Here' another vote for the burning at the stake.

D. Des Chene

A cover pic should be immediately readable from three or four feet away. #1 and #4 work best, but both are misleading as to the topic of the book. But the obelisk will put people in mind of Egypt, not the Reformation. That leaves #1. If Joan of Arc features anywhere in the book, you’re home free.

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