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« This Week's Acquisitions | Main | The disappearing poems (etc.) »

September 08, 2012

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Anastasia

Is this something the college kids are saying? Because I spend 40 hours a week with 14-17 year olds and I have never never never heard this one.

Miriam

I've never heard it--I've only come across it online. So far. On Twitter, it was pointed out to me that it was originally "LOLspeak," but now it's maybe more of a Tumblrism?

Kerry

Many teenagers spell phonetically, but can't pronounce words right to start with (I know this from encountering 'quilty' for 'quality' when I was a teacher). So it could be that 'feels' is how they say 'feelings', swallowing the 'ings', and this has taken off as a shortened form for twitter. Sound plausible?

Dr. Koshary

I haven't heard that one, but I have noticed an odd fad lately for pluralizing adjectives and verbs. (One of my TAs last year liked to say "So many prouds!" when zi was pleased with a student's essay.) Perhaps we can just grit our teeth and hope that the fad blows over in a little while?

Tom

What's annoying about not wanting your neighbours' kids on your lawn?

AC

So annoying. I think it derives not from a desire to shorten words but from various internet memes based on humorously incorrect syntax and spelling ("I can haz cheezburger," etc.). For example, after an acquaintance made a silly grammar mistake on a Facebook post, she corrected herself and asserted that "English is many hards."

Bourgeois Nerd

I don't know the context of which you are complaining, but I do use that usage in one of my online discussion groups as a jokey thing.

Miriam

BN: Eh, my (mild) irritation is more about serious usage than joking around; I've got no objections to LOLspeak. As long as my students don't start writing about how "Wordsworth has many feels out in nature."

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