My Photo
Blog powered by Typepad

Currently reading...

Personal favorites

Search my library


Library Thing


Victorian Studies

Authors

Fiction

Fine Arts

Buy Books!

Blogs, Book- and Academia-Related

Sitemeter

Amazon

« Low expectations | Main | Future titles for Clandestine Classics: A modest proposal »

October 11, 2012

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451aed169e2017ee41be462970d

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Scattered musings: two teaching-related thoughts:

Comments

Levi Stahl

Something I overheard a boss tell a colleague long ago at the workplace, and which seems to be close to true and worth keeping in mind, is that everyone cries at the office sometime. Some of the same questions of proportion apply--if differently scaled-as in most workplaces it's not as if the patient has died on the table. Still, you never make fun, never take it lightly, if you want to be a good boss or colleague.

Victoria Rondeau

I teach at a private middle school where the 7th grade math curriculum had been sort of 'flipped' as described in your link. The math teacher is using the Khan Academy videos as an adjunct to other types of instruction. The kids are struggling with the format, and the parents have been in varying degrees of revolt - up to and including the the threat of lawsuits. Stuff is calming down a bit, but it has not been a great beginning. The parents have the impression that the math teacher is 'not teaching', the kids who dislike math/struggle with math don't like the mastery idea (and the accompanying extra work needed to show mastery) and it will take time for them to get used to the new format. As differentiated instruction I can see the logic of the approach, but shudder to think what that type of instruction would do to English/Social studies classes.

Jonathan Dresner

Aren't humanities classrooms effectively "flipped" anyway? If students aren't doing the reading, the class goes nowhere. Sure, there are lectures sometimes, but most decent humanities classes are discussions -- i.e. active participation -- based on out-of-class work.

Nicoleandmaggie

What Jonathan Dresner said.

Miriam

Well, yes, that's the thing...

Servetus

Thanks for thinking your students probably deserve better from you than to be mocked for showing weakness. I've met very few students who are "crying on demand" myself.

The comments to this entry are closed.